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Discussion on Article:
High-Definition PC Experience: Graphics Cards vs. High-Definition Video Playback

Started by: ChorusOfJeers | Date 01/24/09 05:57:33 AM
Comments: 13 | Last Comment:  03/11/09 01:48:54 PM

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1. 
*"The victory of Blu-ray in the war against HD DVD does not mean that the MPEG4 AVC/H.264 codec triumphs over VC-1, though. Many Blu-ray movies use the latter codec. Moreover, movies encoded with the MPEG2 HD codec are still available, too. Thus, all the three codecs must be supported by software and hardware manufacturers."

- How do you tell if a given BR disk uses a given codec for or outputs a given resolution *:
A.1080 i or
B.1080P
...Since someone does not expect this to be a label on its title ? [*Q]
"Today, the most advanced implementation of the audio-over-HDMI feature is available with ATI Radeon HD 4800/4600/4500 series cards. The integrated audio core from Realtek can output 7.1 audio (192kHz/24bits per sample) with a bit rate of 6.144Mbps in AC3, DTS, Dolby True HD, DTS HD and LPCM formats. Nvidia’s GeForce 8, 9 and GTX 200 series are limited by the capabilities of the S/PDIF interface and support 5.1 Dolby Digital, 5.1 DTS, and 2-channel LPCM. The integrated graphics cores Intel GMA 4500 and GeForce 8300 can output 7.1 LPCM audio, too."

- for the most part. You could probably be safe in saying that using the HDMI from one of these 'discreete video cards insures that you will have 'sound'?* Building a speaker system itself is another story,as it may be impossible to predict just what a given BR disk release will implement :

AC3
DTS
Dolby True HD
DTS HD
LPCM are codec type specifications while..

5.1
5.1 DTS
2-channel LPCM
7.1 LPCM are a connection type specification.That is included in various equipment that supports a type of 'stereo'(x # of speakers/type of equipment(line type)).Implementing the Codec.

....of course when you can only plug into the HDTV that has no output to other equipment.[*Q]

______________
I'm supposing that a person wanting to create an HTPC system would want to insure the least cost in doing so at first. So components should have adaquate accomadation for future-proofing for further build outs.
The type of BR player wasn't mentioned.?[ ] and:
Is the support for BR disk,GPU drivers/codecs etc . dimenished if you wanted to take advantage of a system that had more memory supported - 64 bit Op.Sys.?[ ]
What about Lynix ?[ ]

Out from the blue...the MPEG4 AVC/H.264 codec:
You camera you just paid x dollars for does the MPEG4 movies only for its format.How can you be assured that you will be able to edit,and store your MPEG4 movies to disk for playback ? From my travels I haven't found that accesories are easily noticed to support this Format for editing on the computer (e.g.programs software proprietor suggestions).You should be able to invite among several proprietors to run your equipment (e.g.apple only).

P.S. I really believe that given certain emphasis,HTPC systems for supporters of them,are not really quite interested in supporting BR,for HDTV resolutions,for playback of studio release Movie Titles.Though it may be a requirement of such a system. The HTPC purpose is purely for the "PC"aspect of doing so.

*Hello.X-bit lab articles have been always informative in my browsing of them.

Thanks for the posting space.
0 0 [Posted by: ChorusOfJeers  | Date: 01/24/09 05:57:33 AM]
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Thank you for the input.

"How do you tell if a given BR disk uses a given codec for or outputs a given resolution:
A.1080 i or
B.1080P"
There are no movie BD releases with 1080i resolution.
"it may be impossible to predict just what a given BR disk release will implement"
Of course we cannot predict that, but DVDs and BDs usually have this information on the backside. Seriously, those high-resolution titles often have a number of tracks and one can chose the desired onre depending on the hardware config.
Besides, I've seen none BDs with 7.1 audio, all that I have tried are 5.1.
"for the most part. You could probably be safe in saying that using the HDMI from one of these 'discreete video cards insures that you will have 'sound'?"
It does not insure, the reasons why are explained in the article.
0 0 [Posted by:  | Date: 01/24/09 02:37:46 PM]
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"I'm supposing that a person wanting to create an HTPC system would want to insure the least cost in doing so at first. So components should have adaquate accomadation for future-proofing for further build outs.
The type of BR player wasn't mentioned.?[ ] and:
Is the support for BR disk,GPU drivers/codecs etc . dimenished if you wanted to take advantage of a system that had more memory supported - 64 bit Op.Sys.?[ ]
What about Lynix ?[ ]"
In order to get adequate Blu-ray compatibilitty, you need to have a BD drive + Cyberlink's PowerDVD version 7.3 or higher.
0 0 [Posted by:  | Date: 01/24/09 02:45:20 PM]
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2. 
Nvidia’s GeForce 8/9 GPUs do not offer hardware bitstream processing for the VC-1 codec and have a somewhat higher CPU load when playing VC-1 videos than ATI’s Radeons have.


Not entirely true. Cards based on the G98 chip fully support VC-1 acceleration. Purevideo 3 can be found on items such as Geforce 8400 GS, Geforce 8200, 8300, Geforce 9300M GS, 9300 GS, GeForce 9400 GT are all PV3 cards/IGP's that can do VC-1 easily. As linux users are enjoying right now with VDPAU (the linux equivalent to PV for windows) playing back 1080p high bit rate VC-1 is easily done on a 8400GS (G98) or 8200/8300 IGP with the slowest of processors out there with typical cpu loads of 3-5%. Even a underclocked Sempron 1250 is overkill. (personally have one in a 8200 board underclocked to 1 Ghz and still only hits 5% cpu during high bitrate 1080p playback)

Here is what the typical load looks like during vc-1 playback on a 8200 IGP usind vdpau.

http://i30.photobucket.co...6/deanjo/1230081415-3.png
0 0 [Posted by: deanjo  | Date: 01/24/09 08:22:15 AM]
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According to Nvidia, only the GeForce 9300/9400-series IGP support bitstream decoding of VC-1.

Moreover, the G98 is not a part of the GeForce 8000-series.
0 0 [Posted by:  | Date: 01/24/09 02:49:29 PM]
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3. 
What about 24 Hz/fps playback?

Somo other reviews have been shown that ATI cards are not as good as NVidia for playback at this setting.

I think it would be an important topic to include in the review.
0 0 [Posted by: ZORAX  | Date: 01/26/09 07:12:02 AM]
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We have no equipment that supports 24Hz playback in the laboratory. Moreover, one should consider at least two things when using 24Hz playback:

- It is very hard to distinguish between 24Hz and normal 60Hz playback.
- Only the content originally shot in 24 frames per second will benefit from 24Hz setting of the player/TV (e.g., only the motion pictures on discs). Are there a lot of consumers who will reset their equipment before/after watching every movie? In fact, even additional content on discs is not shot at 24 frames per second.
0 0 [Posted by:  | Date: 01/26/09 12:21:23 PM]
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I have the Intel DG45FC board (Mini-ITX form-factor) and it has a DVI and HDMI port. I tried it last night @ 1080/24p on my Sony Bravia and it worked great. I'm very happy with it.
0 0 [Posted by: gwolfman  | Date: 01/27/09 07:07:57 AM]
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4. 
Today, the most advanced implementation of the audio-over-HDMI feature is available with ATI Radeon HD 4800/4600/4500 series cards. The integrated audio core from Realtek can output 7.1 audio (192kHz/24bits per sample) with a bit rate of 6.144Mbps in AC3, DTS, Dolby True HD, DTS HD and LPCM formats.

So your saying the 4800/4600/4500 can bitstream DTS-HD Master Audio and Dolby True HD to a receiver? I thought they could only convert these to 7.1 LPCM then output them. Anyone have more info?
0 0 [Posted by: gwolfman  | Date: 01/26/09 12:39:41 PM]
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As ATI says, it is subject to digital rights management limitations: maximum supported audio stream bandwidth is 6.144 Mbps, which may mean that the cards can physically passthrough those audio tracks to receivers. The problem is that there may be software limitations as well as incompatibilities with certain receivers.
0 0 [Posted by:  | Date: 01/26/09 03:11:30 PM]
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5. 
No bitstreaming? You better read up on the ASUS Xonar HDAV1.3. We've been bitstreaming True HD and DTS HD Master for some time. 24hz video is still in the works. You better visit AVS Forums and read up.
0 0 [Posted by: davinleeds  | Date: 01/27/09 08:20:24 PM]
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The ASUS Xonar doesn't support 24Hz?
0 0 [Posted by: gwolfman  | Date: 01/28/09 12:59:08 PM]
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6. 
Now it does. I told you it was in the works. The point being, we had bitstreaming at the time of the article and the Xonar solution was not mentioned.
0 0 [Posted by: davinleeds  | Date: 03/11/09 01:48:54 PM]
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