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In an attempt to let the customers choose between processors with different heat-dissipation and power consumption, Intel will add a special marking on its chips in LGA775 packaging.

All boxed versions of Intel’s new Pentium 4 and Celeron-D processors for the Socket T infrastructure will sport the so-called “Platform Compatibility Guide” code that will tell whether the chip can dissipate 84W or 115W, sources with knowledge of the matter said. Initially only boxed processors will have this code printed on the boxes, but eventually Intel plans to put the mark on the IHS of all chips in LGA775 packaging.

Platform Compatibility Guide 04A (PGC 04A) will be intended for mainstream and value processors, such as Celeron D and some Pentium 4 chips at $278 price-point or below. Processors that correspond to PGC 04A should have TDP of 84W or below.

Platform Compatibility Guide 04B (PGC 04B) will be intended for all Intel processors, including high-end, mainstream and value processor. Processors that correspond to PGC 04A should have TDP of 115W or below.

Processors that consume a lot of energy not only dissipate more heat, but also stress components of mainboards. As a result, loads of customers would like to install less power-hungry chips into their desktops so that to use quieter coolers and not get expensive mainboards that have specially-designed CPU power circuitries for processors that devour loads of power.

As reported numerous times, because of certain issues with Intel’s 90nm fabrication process, actual chips made using it heat pretty well presumably as a result of power leakage processes. Power leakage is current flowing in a circuitry that is not being used at the moment. While the problem has been around for decades, it became dramatically serious with Intel’s Pentium 4 E processors known as Prescott.

Starting from the second quarter of 2004 Intel Corporation will mark its CPUs according to their position in its product family or series. The first digit in the model number reflects product positioning; another two digits reveal relative performance within a concrete family of chips. The rating will make pretty tough to compare microprocessors of different series by their working frequency, but is supposed to reveal clear processor’s place in its family.

Officials from Intel did not comment on the story.

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