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Intel confirmed Friday that it had cancelled the Tejas, Jayhawk and Tulsa microprocessors originally scheduled for the year 2005 launch. Now the company promises to deliver dual-core chips across all market segments next year.

Intel claims that it will have top-to-bottom families of dual-core microprocessors next year. The plans now include Itanium 2 chip “Montecito” for mission-critical enterprise servers as well as dual-core products for mobile computers, desktop computers and typical mainstream servers.

Dual-core processors can process two times more data per clock and handle more than one threads at once. This allows the whole system to perform a lot better under high load when running multiply processors.

The new chips for desktops will fit into the platform guidance submitted by Intel for its 2005 products before. Therefore, on the chipset level the new desktop dual-core processors are expected to be compatible with Grantsdale (i915), Alderwood (i925X) and Lakeport chipsets that are anticipated to roll out in 2004 and 2005. It is not clear whether the chips will fit into Socket T infrastructure.

An Intel spokesman emphasized that the changes in plans are done in order to offer better solutions for customers, as dual-core chips typically perform better than single-core microprocessors. There were no issues with Tejas, Jayhawk and Tulsa, he said. The representatives declined to comment on actual performance and estimated benchmark results for the dual-core chips.

Originally dual-core microprocessors from Intel were scheduled for very late 2005 or 2006 introduction. But lately Intel discovered that there is a possibility to roll them out already next year at the time when Tejas should have been here.

Dual-core processors would usually fit into about two spaces for a single-core chips on the wafers, it should be noted. Therefore, dual-core processors are more expensive to produce.

Even though it is logical to expect Intel to offer dual-core chips for desktops, mobiles and servers that share the same micro-architecture, Intel’s official declined to comment on architecture-specific questions. There are rumours that all chips are to feature Pentium M-like architecture.

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