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While Intel’s code-named Smithfield microprocessor set to be released in mid-2005 will open the doors to dual-core computing on desktops, the mainstream market will only get chips with two processing engine in 2006, along with the microprocessor code-named Presler.

Presler – Smithfield with Vanderpool, LaGrande?

According to a report from Japanese web-site PC Watch, the code-named Presler microprocessor will be released sometimes in mid-2006 and will be made using 65nm process technology. The die size of the chip is projected to be around 140 square millimeters. From the architectural standpoint, the Presler may be a shrunk version of the chip code-named Smithfield, Intel’s first dual-core desktop product, however, it may sport a lot of improvements over the current computing engines.

Given the timeframe for the Presler processor, it is likely to feature significant enhancements over the Smithfield.

Adding of security and virtualization capabilities will be performed in the course of Intel’s forthcoming platform enhancements. In 2005 Intel plans to advance personal computing – now called digital home and office – platforms with dual-core Smithfield processors with 2MB cache, Enhanced Intel Speed Step (EIST), EM64T and iAMT features. A year later – in 2006 – Intel’s follow-up platforms will get Vanderpool, LaGrande technologies, next-generation iAMT and next-generation dual-core processor produced using 65nm process technology. Currently Intel refers its ‘05 digital home and office platform as Lyndon, while ‘06 platforms are called Bridge Creek and Averill.

Intel did not comment for the story.

Smithfield – Intel’s First Dual-Core Desktop Offering

Code-named Smithfield dual-core microprocessors for desktops from Intel Corp. that are projected to emerge in the third quarter, 2005, will run at 2.80GHz, 3.00GHz and 3.20GHz, integrate 2MB of unified cache, utilize 800MHz processor system bus and feature LGA775 form-factor, according to certain reports. The dual-core desktop processor internally called Smithfield will be made using 90nm process technology, each processing engine will use the same architecture with the current Pentium 4 “Prescott” chip, however, the new central processing unit will feature “arbitration logic that will balance bus transactions between the two CPUs”. Smithfield’s die size is about 215 square millimeters.

For some reason Intel has reportedly decided to disable the Hyper-Threading technology with its dual-core desktop chips. This will allow the processors to handle two threads independently more efficiently than current chips do, however, if the chips feature HT tech, they would be able to handle up to four threads of code. The Smithfield will sport EM64T, XD bit as well as Enhanced Intel SpeedStep technologies.

Intel Corp.’s dual-core chips will be branded as x20, x30 and x40. The main difference between these three chips is clock-speed: the x20 runs at 2.8GHz, the x30 operates at 3.00GHz and the x40 functions 3.20GHz.

Vanderpool and LaGrande – Corner Stones of Next-Generation Computing

Intel has been discussing its plans to enable extended security features code-named LaGrande for years now. Previously it was anticipated that the technique was to be implemented into the currently shipping 90nm processors, such as Intel Pentium 4 “Prescott”, however, Intel officially did not confirm this during the launch of the chip.

Beside security capabilities, the Santa Clara, California-based Intel has also been planning to enable advanced parallelism for personal computers in order to increase reliability and add new usage models for end-users. Vanderpool is a hardware tech that splits system into several virtual parts that work independently and use the same resources of the PC. Servers’ central processing units and platforms are also likely to get a virtualization tech: Intel calls it Silvervale, but does not reveal any differences compared to Vanderpool.

Besides innovative Vanderpool and LaGrande technologies, Intel will also add certain features that are likely to be required by numerous professional systems – iAMT, a remote system management capability, and EM64T, 64-bit capability that enables more than 4GB of memory and boosts performance in certain applications.

Dual-Core Chips Will Require New OS

Even though dual-core microprocessor is a significant breakthrough for desktop computers, software still have to learn how to take advantage of additional computing power. Given that current software is still single-threaded, dual-core chips may show up under fire from analysts, as typical benchmark scores by dual-core chips may be lower compared to high-speed single-core.

While all the technologies that are currently discussed are supported by hardware, the potential of revamped capabilities is only likely to be exposed when using Microsoft’s forthcoming Longhorn operating system.

Particularly Vanderpool and LaGrande, just like competing technologies from Advanced Micro Devices, Intel Corp.’s main rival, code-named Presidio and Pacifica, will require support by operating system and are unlikely to be fully functional when running on current generation of OSes. Dual-core chips will bring certain improvements even on current breed of Windows XP operating systems, including those for x86 and x86-64 chips, the Longhorn is expected to further improve simultaneous multi-threading operation.

Microsoft Longhorn is currently anticipated to blend the whole system’s feature-set, as not only processors and chipsets should support advantages like virtualization, but also graphics cards, hard disk drives, I/O controllers and other hardware is likely to require support for certain functionality to take advantage of the Longhorn.

Currently Microsoft Longhorn is expected for release during 2006 – 2007 timeframe.

Discussion

Comments currently: 11
Discussion started: 12/27/04 12:10:55 PM
Latest comment: 08/25/06 08:46:45 AM

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"Particularly Vanderpool and LaGrande, just like competing technologies from Advanced Micro Devices, Intel Corp.’s main rival, code-named Presidio and Pacifica, will require support by operating system and are unlikely to be fully functional when running on current generation of OSes."

You do realise that Vanderpool has been tested by Intel at their last IDF (sept 2004) on Linux and WinXP, don't you?

=> http://www.hardwarezone.com/articles/view.php?cid=18&id=1235&pg=3
0 0 [Posted by:  | Date: 12/27/04 12:10:55 PM]
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