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Intel Corp. plans to integrate a DirectX 11-class graphics processing unit (GPU) into its next-generation code-named Ivy Bridge central processing unit (CPU). The move will allow the accelerated processing unit (APU) to compete head-to-head with Advanced Micro Devices' Fusion-series of chips that already have DirectX 11 support.

"Intel will integrate the technology in next-generation laptop and desktop chips, as use of the technology in applications will spread by then. [...] When we look at the schedule, we did not think it was... the right time. There's not much usage." said Mooly Eden, vice president and general manager of the PC client group at Intel, in an interview with the IDG News Service.

The latest Intel Core i "Sandy Bridge" microprocessors feature outdated DirectX 10.1-class graphics core and does not support GPGPU technology. By contrast, modern GPUs from ATI/AMD or Nvidia Corp. fully support DirectX 11 along with a number of other advantages that improve quality of video games as well as allow to use graphics processor for general-purpose computing.

Since Ivy Bridge will be made using 22nm process technology, Intel will be able to integrate more logic into the chip. For example, it is rumoured that Ivy Bridge will have 24 stream processors instead of 12 on the Sandy Bridge.

But even Ivy Bridge may not remove the gap between Intel and AMD chips in terms of graphics performance. In its next-generation APUs the Sunnyvale, California-based company may further improve performance and add new features to its integrated GPUs.

 

Tags: Intel, Ivy Bridge, 22nm

Discussion

Comments currently: 2
Discussion started: 01/10/11 07:18:21 AM
Latest comment: 01/11/11 05:22:02 AM

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1. 
AMD Fusion for desktops comes out in a few months, it'll have DX11 and be a few times more powerful (the GPU of course).
Mobile Fusion is already here.

Intel is far behind with their GPUs. The whole point of integrating a GPU within the CPU is to make it a lot more powerful. TDP isn't a problem, as you can install a big cooler, unlike with a north bridge.
Not to mention their terrible drivers, and the lack of 23.976 Hz refresh rate support (which is a chipset bug that carried on from the 5 series).
0 0 [Posted by: Harry Lloyd  | Date: 01/10/11 07:18:21 AM]
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2. 
DX 10.1 is what their capable of, to deliver Sandy Bridge in time before AMD's APUs. Yet, not quite a big loss yet for Intel as we have to find significant use/advantage of those integrated GPU's outside gaming.
0 0 [Posted by: zodiacfml  | Date: 01/11/11 05:22:02 AM]
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