Intel Sets the Prices for 64-bit Pentium 4 Processors

Date for Desktop Chips with Extended Memory 64 Technology Revealed

by Anton Shilov
05/13/2004 | 01:56 AM

Intel had set the prices for its Pentium 4 processors with enabled Extended Memory 64 Technology, X-bit labs has learnt. Apparently, the chips will not be more expensive compared to the products with no 64-bit capability.

 

Starting from August 1, 2004 for $278

Intel Pentium 4 processors with 64-bit registers will officially start to be sold on the 1st of August, 2004, at speed-bins and price-points equal to the ordinary desktop Pentium 4 chips.

The product line will contain Pentium 4 at 3.20GHz, 3.40GHz and 3.60GHz priced at $278, $417 and $637 respectively. But on the August, 22, Intel is said to slash the pricing of its 3.40GHz and 3.60GHz chips to $278 and $417. A $637 SKU will join the family of 64-bit Intel Pentium 4 processors with 3.80GHz product introduction. The costs of the Pentium 4 chips with Extended Memory 64 Technology will be equal to processors with no such capability at the same core-clock.

The new chips aimed at server and workstation markets will work with i925X or i925XE chipsets and will come in LGA775 form-factor.

64-bit Not for Everyone?

Earlier this year Intel unveiled its Extended Memory 64 Technology also known under 64-bit Extension Technology or IA32e that let Intel’s Prescott, Nocona and Potomac processors to execute specially-written 64-bit code while maintaining absolute compatibility with today’s 32-bit applications. Nocona is code-name for Intel’s upcoming Xeon processors for 2-way servers and workstations launching in Q2 2004; Potomac is the name of the core that enables next-generation Xeon MP chips unveiling in the Q1 2005; Prescott is the core that powers current Pentium 4 E processors and will power special chips for uni-processor servers and workstations with 64-bit capability. Previously it was believed that all Prescott processors in LGA775 packaging, such as Intel Pentium 4 E, would sport EM64T, but Intel denied such claim.

Intel said it would ship Prescott processors with 64-bit capability for 1P applications only to system integrators requesting such microprocessors for their servers and workstations. Although all Prescott CPUs, including Intel Pentium 4 and Celeron, are 64-bit from micro-architectural standpoint, processors supplying for retail channels as well as for typical desktops will have their 64-bit capability disabled. However, some sources doubt that it will be absolutely impossible for end-users and hardware enthusiasts to get Intel’s 64-bit Pentium 4 chips. They suggest that there will be some of such microprocessors supplied as OEM parts and reaching the channel.

Intel’s officials did not comment on the story.