Intel’s New Hyper-Threading Set to Return in 2007

Intel Preps New Hyper-Threading Tech with 45nm Chips

by Anton Shilov
01/30/2007 | 09:58 PM

Intel Corp.’s Hyper-Threading technology, which was introduced back in 2001 along with Intel Xeon processors with 512KB L2 cache and claimed to have ignited multi-core x86 microprocessor era, is not available with Intel’s current-generation Core 2 processors. However, that is going to change when several new chips arrive in a few quarters.

 

The new chips code-named Yorkfield and Wolfdale – both designed for desktops and uniprocessor workstations and made using 45nm process technology – will reintroduce the Hyper-Threading to the market, a news-story at HKEPC web-site suggested. Currently it is unclear whether the new Hyper-Threading will be able to execute two threads of code on each physical core simultaneously, or will increase the number of threads.

Even if the “new” Hyper-Threading inherits capabilities of the “old” version of this technology, then dual-core Wolfdale will be able to execute up to four threads momentarily, while quad-core Yorkfield will be capable of executing up to eight threads at once.

It is unclear whether other members of the Penryn family of processors, which includes 15 products for desktop, mobile, workstation and enterprise segments, support the Hyper-Threading technology as well.

Intel’s code-named Wolfdale processor with up to 6MB level-two cache, which is likely to consist of 400 million transistors, is projected to ship in Q1 2008 and to be compatible with LGA775 infrastructure that supports 1333MHz Quad Pumped Bus (QPB). The code-named Yorkfield chip – which is rumoured to feature two Wolfdale chips on a single piece of substrate – will sport up to 12MB L2 cache, 1066MHz processor system bus and is likely to be available in Q4 2007. Both processors sport the full list of Intel’s latest technologies, such as 64-bit capability, execute disable bit, Viiv, VPro, TXT, virtualization and so on. In addition, all 45nm chips support 50 new SSE4 instructions.

Intel Corp. did not comment on the news-story.