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Nvidia Corp. on Tuesday officially enabled its 3D Vision Surround technology which allows to span stereoscopic 3D image across three displays. The feature initially works only on the latest graphics processors and only on beta drivers, but that limitation is hardly too crucial, considering the price end-users would have to pay for an Nvidia 3D Vision Surround setup.

Nvidia 3D Vision Surround is currently the world’s only consumer, multi-display 3D solution which allows users to span stereo 3D content across three high-definition monitors with 120Hz or higher refresh rate or projectors for immersive gaming experience. In order to make the technology work, end-users will have to install at least two high-end Nvidia GeForce GTX 400-series graphics cards. Nvidia’s 3D Vision Surround will compete directly with ATI Eyefinity technology that allows to play video games on up to six displays (in case one graphics processor is used). Nvidia’s technology does not seem to support six monitors, but can enable stereoscopic 3D effects on three, which will indisputably make gaming very exciting.

Unfortunately, at present the 3D Vision Surround is a ridiculously expensive technology: two GeForce GTX 480 graphics boards will cost around $1000, Nvidia 3D Vision kit adds another $175, three relatively large (~24”) yet not too expensive displays with 120Hz refresh rate will also cost around $1200. With nearly $2400 price-tag for graphics cards and displays only, the cost of the whole setup – that should naturally include a high-end microprocessor, plenty of memory and a lot of hard drive space for modern games – will easily rich $4000.

Those who that want to build a 3D Vision Surround rig should download the entire 3D Vision CD v1.31 which contains v258.69 GeForce and 3D Vision beta drivers. It should be noted that this driver has some issues we quad SLI mode in 3D Vision Surround and Nvidia intends to provide a future driver update to support this configuration.

Tags: Nvidia, 3D Vision, Stereo 3D, Geforce, Fermi

Discussion

Comments currently: 2
Discussion started: 06/29/10 08:07:45 PM
Latest comment: 07/16/10 07:57:13 AM

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1. 
Nvidia’s technology [...] can enable stereoscopic 3D effects on three, which will indisputably make gaming very exciting.


Indisputably? A headache, sore eyes, and funny glasses don't seem that exciting to me. There, disputed.
0 0 [Posted by: J_Morgan  | Date: 06/29/10 08:07:45 PM]
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2. 
Just wondering if J.Morgan has actually tried it. I have had Nvidia 3D Vision operating operating on a single monitor for the past three months. Yes,some people might experience problems but I have not come across anyone yet who finds that they can't play it after adjusting the depth of field view. Allied with Cyberlink Power DVD 10 Ultra mark II I can now watch standard DVDs in 3D stereo. It is great on MS Flight Sim too. So far the only problem is Nvidia's latest software patch still does not allow Blu-Ray 3D vision on my Samsung 120Hz screen. Previously Cyberlink's drivers were hopeless for Blu-Ray on Samsung screensbut now that only applies to 3D Blu-Ray for me. Try it first --you might be surprised how good it is!
0 0 [Posted by: tigertop  | Date: 07/16/10 07:57:13 AM]
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