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Nvidia Corp. on Wednesday introduced two professional graphics cards - VGX K1 and VGX K2 - for cloud computing environments, which will allow engineers and design professionals to work anywhere on virtually any device and still have access to the computing and graphics performance of a GPU-powered workstation. The solutions are based on four or two Kepler chips.

"The VGX platform has been developed to bring rich, interactive graphics to all enterprise virtual desktop users. With VGX K2 in the data center, designers and engineers who create the core intellectual property for their companies can now access their IP from any device and still enjoy workstation-class performance," said Jeff Brown, general manager of the professional solutions group at Nvidia.

Two initial graphics cards to support Nvidia VGX platform are the K1 and K2:

  • Nvidia VGX K1: four entry-level Kepler GPUs with 192 stream processors (768 stream processors in total), 16GB DDR3 memory, requires 6-pin power connector and PCI Express 3.0 slot. Designed for up to drive simplistic applications for up to 105 users.
  • Nvidia VGX K2: two high-end Kepler GPUs [allegedly GK104] with 1536 stream processors (3072 stream processors in total), 8GB DDR3 memory, requires 8-pin power connector and PCI Express 3.0 slot. Designed to provide high-performance (on par with Quadro K5000) in professional applications for up to two users.

Nvidia VGX platform enables workers for the first time to access a GPU-accelerated desktop similar to a traditional local PC from any device (thin client, laptop, tablet or smartphone) regardless of its operating system, and enjoy a responsive experience for the full spectrum of applications previously only available on an office PC. The platform's manageability options and ultra-low latency remote display capabilities extend this convenience to those using 3D design and simulation tools, which had previously been too intensive for a virtualized desktop.

Nvidia VGX uniquely addresses the user experience issues of traditional virtualized desktop infrastructure by adding a fully virtualized GPU board to the data center. This now enables up to one hundred users to share a VGX board with a true PC experience with GPU-accelerated VDI (GPU-VDI). One of the key features of GPU-accelerated desktop virtualization cloud platform is Nvidia’s sophisticated VGX Hypervisor that manages the GPU resources to allow multiple users to share common hardware, improving user density on a single server while providing true PC performance and compatibility.

Integrating the VGX platform into the corporate network enables enterprise IT departments to address the complex challenges of BYOD (bring your own device) trend and delivers a remote desktop to these devices, providing users the same access they have on their desktop terminal. At the same time, it helps reduce overall IT spend, improve data security and minimize data center complexity.

The Nvidia VGX K2 platform for virtual workstations is expected to be available from leading server OEMs starting in early 2013. VGX K1 should be available around the same time.

Tags: Nvidia, Kepler, VGX, Grid, Geforce, Quadro, NVS, iOS, Android

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