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Some retailers in Tokyo, Japan, started to put up DDR-II memory modules from Corsair Memory for sale. Pretty surprisingly, the modules are clocked at 533MHz and cost not a lot above the cost of DDR at the same speed bin.

Corsair Memory is one of the first module makers, who have already announced and showcased its DDR-II (DDR2) SDRAM components. The firm that is concentrated on delivering high-speed memory sticks with enhanced quality and durability to overclocking and enthusiast communities sells its DDR-II offerings under eXtreme Memory Speed 2 (XMS2) brand-name.

The first products in Corsair’s XMS2 family are the Twin2X1024-4300 – a matched pair of 512MB 533MHz DDR-II modules – as well as XMS2 CM2X512-4300 – a 512MB 533MHz DDR-II module. Both support JEDEC standard 4-4-4-12 latencies for PC2-4300 and come equipped with classic black aluminum heat spreaders. Corsair’s 240-pin DDR-II memory modules will function at 1.8V supply compared to 2.6V memory voltage for conventional DDR modules. The new XMS2 sticks, as well as other DDR-II products, will utilize FBGA memory chips for better stability, thermal efficiency, enhanced scalability and better overclockability. DDR-II memory modules will have 5.25” length and smaller than 1.3” height.

Akiba PC Hotline reports that the Corsair XMS2 CM2X512-4300 memory modules from the first available batch cost about $270 per unit. While it is still about $110 higher compared to $160 for 512MB DDR modules at 533MHz available now in the USA, we should keep in mind that prices in Tokyo, Japan are generally higher compared to the USA and Europe, moreover, retailers usually earn additional margins on just released products.

Despite of the fact that 512MB memory modules for $270 are not going to become mainstream this year, the price-point itself is not astonishingly high and some enthusiasts are very likely to jump on the DDR-II bandwagon when mainboards with 204-pin slots are available.

Yesterday we reported that mainboard makers will either install four 184-pin slots for DDR memory on Grantsdale mainboards, or a couple of 184-pin slots of DDR and a pair of 204-pin slots for DDR-II modules. Moreover, quite some offerings among the first batch of mainboards based on VIA PT890 will sport 4 slots for conventional DIMM modules and none for innovative DDR-II DIMMs. Only Intel’s i925X-based (Alderwood) applications, a chipset that presumably is able to take advantage of x86 64-bit extension technology found in the next-generation Pentium 4 and Xeon (Nocona core) microprocessors, are expected to be DDR-II only.

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