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Corsair Memory, a leading producer of high-performance memory products, said on Wednesday that it would stop selling its advanced memory modules powered by Elpida’s “Hyper” memory chips. Corsair advised all end-users who already own Dominator GT and similar DDR3 products based on Elpida’s chips and who have issues with them to return them to the maker.

“We have seen a number of reports across various forums about failures of modules built with Elpida “Hyper” RAMs. Through lab testing, we have now been able to reproduce similar failures. We are continuing to test to determine the cause of these failures. […] Due to these failures, we will no longer sell Hyper-based modules until the issue can be resolved. We have also have asked our retailers to return any modules they currently have on their shelves,” an official statement by Corsair Memory reads.

The products that are affected carry the following part numbers: TW3X4G1600C6GTF, TR3X6G1866C7GTF, TR3X6G2000C8GTF, TR3X3G2000C7GTF and TR3X6G2000C7GTF. As it can be observed, the impacted memory products are rather advanced 1600MHz, 1866MHz or 2000MHz memory modules that belong to Dominator GT or XMS3 product families.

“We are working on enhancing our manufacturing and testing process to be able to offer these parts again as soon as possible,” Corsair added.

Elpida’s most advanced DDR3 can operate in 667MHz – 2500MHz frequency range with 1.2V – 1.5V voltage settings.

Tags: Corsair, DDR3, Elpida, DRAM

Discussion

Comments currently: 4
Discussion started: 07/08/09 09:03:51 AM
Latest comment: 07/17/09 02:42:28 AM
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1. 
Wooow. Let\'s blame Elpida for heavy failures our overvoltaged, overburned maximally tweaked models with improper CL settings.

Elpida has great chips but obviously that some DDR3 low voltage chips refuse to work with old X38/X48 and PII chipsets and it\'s not a problem in Elpida which complies ddr3 standards but in stupid daddys boy-girl OCers that trust Corzer too much and squeeze that chips over nominal 15% overvoltage that com,es as default on Corzerr modules
0 0 [Posted by: OmegaHuman  | Date: 07/08/09 09:03:51 AM]
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2. 
Wooow. Let\\\'s blame Elpida for heavy failures our overvoltaged, overburned maximally tweaked models with improper CL settings.

Elpida has great chips but obviously that some DDR3 low voltage chips refuse to work with old X38/X48 and PII chipsets and it\\\'s not a problem in Elpida which complies ddr3 standards but in stupid daddys boy-girl OCers that trust Corzer too much and squeeze that chips over nominal 15% overvoltage that com,es as default on Corzerr modules


I\'m not sure as to how you are coming to that conclusion. From what I understand, memory makers who produce enthusiast products usually have the chip manufacturer bin a set of memory chips that can handle the tweaks the memory manufacturers such as Corsair apply for their enthusiast line of memory modules.

While I\'m not sure why Corsair did not catch this, as they guarantee the high performance modules are thoroughly tested before being shipped out, it may be an issue where the chips are not running at the rated speed Corsair has them set to or it could be a defect in a particular set of binned chips. The article does not really state why or how the memory modules are failing. It only states Corsair\'s announcement in stopping the sale of the Dominator GT and similar DDR3 modules and what certain model types are affected.

I\'m not sure how you\'re rant on OC\'ers (such as myself) relates to the question at hand. But it\'s seems to be baiting material and does not add any constructive discussion about the article. Lets keep to the topic at hand please.
0 0 [Posted by: akiraray112  | Date: 07/08/09 11:20:47 AM]
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OmegaHuman is right! Elpida is manufacturing the chips but cannot guarantee functionality above max. recognized ddr3 standard. I'm working with these kind of memory and I know what am I talking about. The premium price you pay for higher speed and lower latency is because they have to test a big lot of memory modules (like I do) and select the ones that are qualified for high performance. The rest is selled at 1066, 1333, 1600 max. with high latency, normal to low performance.
0 0 [Posted by: novv  | Date: 07/17/09 02:42:28 AM]
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3. 
Its about time some of these posts should also be returned to their sender
0 0 [Posted by: alpha0ne  | Date: 07/10/09 09:45:13 PM]
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