News
 

Bookmark and Share

(2) 

Rambus, a designer of various memory and interface technologies, has announced the development of a fast power-on, low-power clocking technology that can enable a whole new class of memory devices. The new technology enables 5Gb/s+ data transfer speeds with minimal power consumption.

“Through this work, we’ve dramatically reduced system complexity and have saved substantial power while increasing performance to more than 5Gb/s per differential link. When incorporated into an SoC-to-memory interface, or SoC-to-SoC link, this development can significantly reduce the memory system power and time-to-first access, driving us closer to the vision of energy proportional computing,” said Jared Zerbe, technical director at Rambus.

Implemented in a 40nm low-power CMOS process, this technology is capable of transitioning from a zero-power idle state to a 5Gb/s+ data transfer rate in 5ns while achieving active power of only 2.4mW/Gb/s.

In order to improve the energy efficiency of servers and mobile systems, system designers are continually looking for ways to reduce the energy required by the memory subsystem. Memories typically used in today’s server applications are challenged to cycle in and out of the lowest power operating state rapidly. In mobile systems, which support a wide range of power modes, low power operation is usually accomplished through use of complex power state circuits. With this approach, developed by Rambus Labs, a feed-forward architecture is used to achieve extremely fast turn-on and turn-off, simplifying the system design and significantly reducing the overall system power requirements.

Tags: Rambus, DRAM

Discussion

Comments currently: 2
Discussion started: 06/17/11 08:57:23 AM
Latest comment: 06/17/11 10:16:23 AM

[1-2]

1. 
Sadly the only reason I see them developing this, or anything for that matter, is for revenues from patent infringement.

Rambus basically scouts out promising and/or obvious technology trends, then rushes to develop a "solution" that can be as broadly patented as possible. Thus it can lay out it's "patent traps" as effectively as possible.

All it takes is a few big players to "pay up" to keep funding the beast.
1 1 [Posted by: xrror  | Date: 06/17/11 08:57:23 AM]
Reply

2. 
I wonder how many lawyers Rambus hired before announcing this patent.
2 0 [Posted by: TA152H  | Date: 06/17/11 10:16:23 AM]
Reply

[1-2]

Add your Comment




Related news

Latest News

Monday, July 28, 2014

6:02 pm | Microsoft’s Mobile Strategy Seem to Fail: Sales of Lumia and Surface Remain Low. Microsoft Still Cannot Make Windows a Popular Mobile Platform

12:11 pm | Intel Core i7-5960X “Haswell-E” De-Lidded: Twelve Cores and Alloy-Based Thermal Interface. Intel Core i7-5960X Uses “Haswell-EP” Die, Promises Good Overclocking Potential

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

10:40 pm | ARM Preps Second-Generation “Artemis” and “Maya” 64-Bit ARMv8-A Offerings. ARM Readies 64-Bit Cores for Non-Traditional Applications

7:38 pm | AMD Vows to Introduce 20nm Products Next Year. AMD’s 20nm APUs, GPUs and Embedded Chips to Arrive in 2015

4:08 am | Microsoft to Unify All Windows Operating Systems for Client PCs. One Windows OS will Power PCs, Tablets and Smartphones