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Problems with li-ion batteries are still not going away. Packard Bell, a well-known maker of personal computers, on Wednesday announced that it would recall batteries contained in certain notebooks made in 2007 since those computers can catch fire because of their lithium-ion accumulators.

Packard Bell recalls batteries with potentially defective battery cells contained in certain Packard Bell EasyNote MX36, MX37, MX51 and MX52 notebook computers. The recall only affects units manufactured between July and December 2007. The affected units were mainly sold in Europe. No affected units were sold in the United States.

The battery cells contained in the affected units may experience internal short circuits which can potentially cause the cells to overheating and/or catch fire. There is no risk of electrocution to the user, the company said.

End-users of EasyNote MX36, MX37, MX51 and MX52 notebook computers should visit the company’s website or contact Packard Bell’s service hotline to determine if their computer is affected by this recall. Additionally, as a precautionary measure, users of the affected computers should remove the battery pack and operate the computer via the power cord.

There have been no reports of injuries.

Tags: Packard Bell, Failures

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