Intel and Nokia Form Strategic Alliance

Nokia Goes x86 with Intel

by Anton Shilov
06/23/2009 | 04:31 PM

Intel Corp. and Nokia Corp. on Tuesday said that they are forming a long-term relationship to develop a new class of Intel x86-based mobile computing device and chipset architectures which will combine the performance of powerful computers with high-bandwidth mobile broadband communications and ubiquitous Internet connectivity.

 

“This Intel and Nokia collaboration unites and focuses many of the brightest computing and communications minds in the world, and will ultimately deliver open and standards-based technologies, which history shows drive rapid innovation, adoption and consumer choice,” said Anand Chandrasekher, Intel's senior vice president and general manager of the company’s ultra mobility group.

To realize the vision, both companies are expanding their longstanding relationship to define a new mobile platform beyond today's smartphones, notebooks and netbooks, enabling the development of a variety of innovative hardware, software and mobile Internet services.

The Intel and Nokia effort includes collaboration in several open source mobile Linux software projects. Intel will also acquire a Nokia HSPA/3G modem IP license for use in future products. The companies expect many innovations to result from this collaboration over time.

The effort also includes technology development and cooperation in several open source software initiatives in order to develop common technologies for use in the Moblin and Maemo platform projects, which will deliver Linux-based operating systems for these future mobile computing devices.

Building on today's announcement, Intel and Nokia have signed an agreement that will enable Intel to license Nokia's HSPA/3G modem technologies with the aim of developing advanced mobile computing solutions that deliver a powerful and flexible computing experience – combining the best-in-class 3GPP modem technology with the high performance and low power consumption of future Intel Architecture-based platforms. The Nokia modem license complements Intel's broadband wireless technologies and will enable the company to extend chipset solutions incorporating Nokia's modem technologies across its mobility offerings in the future.

Action plans have not been announced. Nevertheless, it is highly likely that Intel will ship its code-named Moorestown and Medfield system-on-chip devices to the top phone maker. Made using 45nm fabrication process, Moorestown may power mobile Internet devices and communicators, whereas Medfield, which are to be made utilizing 32nm process technology, may find home inside Nokia’s smartphones due in 2011.