Apple Mobile Platform May Turn Out as “New Windows” Due to Microsoft’ Late Arrival to Tablet Game

Apple’s Platforms Could Finally Compete with Windows Head-to-Head - Analyst

by Anton Shilov
11/21/2012 | 01:50 PM

 

 

Although Microsoft Corp. was one of the first companies who paid attention to tablets, it was Apple, which popularized media tablets and created a new industry with over a hundred of millions of units sold annually. In fact, since Microsoft arrived late to the slate market with competitive offerings, Apple’s platforms may become much more viable competitors to Windows than they are today.

Since Apple’s iOS is still popular on the market of smartphones, remains the top operating system on smartphones, whereas notebooks with Mac OS are gaining popularity particularly in the U.S., Apple may become a formidable mobile platform holder going forward, according to UBS Securities’s hardware analyst Steve Milunovich. The market observer believes that as tablets are going to outsell notebooks in the coming years, whereas MacBook notebooks are stealing market share away from PCs with Windows, the importance of Apple will increase dramatically in the future.

“Windows tablets are late to the game – notebook vendors endured two years of cannibalization by iOS and Android tablets. Apple’s increasing influence in the post-PC era bodes well for its standing in the next leg of tablet growth. Its iOS and OS X operating systems may become the dominant mobile personal computing ecosystem, eclipsing Windows-based notebooks and tablets,” wrote Mr. Milunovich in a note to clients, reports Tech Trader Daily blog.

 

Numerous market analysts these days compare sales of Apple’s MacBooks + iPads to sales of other PC makers’ notebooks and tablets and draw conclusions that the market share of Apple on the mobile PC market in general is increasing rapidly. Such approach is hardly correct as tablets and laptops are used for different purposes and a lot of work is still done on PCs. However, this does not mean that the importance of Apple ecosystem cannot grow considerably in the light of lackluster welcome of Windows 8 and better integration of Apple devices into personal ecosystems.

“One benefit of the rising Apple brand could be a meaningful switch of Windows PC users to Macs. We hear that in enterprises that are giving employees a choice of PC, more than expected are shifting to Mac. In the consumer market, we expect to Apple to gain share as the younger generation has grown up on Apples at school. Pretty soon it could be that the ‘rebels’ will be the Windows users rather than the Mac users,” added Mr. Milunovich.