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DTS, a designer of high-definition audio solutions, has announced that the T-Mobile G2x with Google by LG, specifically designed for gamers and music lovers, are the first smartphone to integrate DTS Ultra Mobile, a technology that brings high-quality sound to mobile consumers.

"Today’s consumers not only demand the best quality, they expect it in all of their electronics, especially smartphones. The DTS integration creates a rich, enhanced sound with depth and dimensionality - bringing a unique and compelling option to market that’s tailored to those using smartphones for gaming and music enjoyment," said Randy Meyerson, director, product management, T-Mobile USA.

The DTS Ultra Mobile solution includes two innovative audio technologies - DTS Envelo and DTS Boost - that together offer consumers a "richer, warmer and more engaging" experience when listening to music or playing games on the T-Mobile G2x smartphone.


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DTS Envelo elevates audio with clear vocals and more defined musical instruments that absorb the consumer in a richer, more enhanced sound experience by widening the sound and adding both depth and dimensionality. When using headphones, the virtual acoustic space created by DTS Envelo creates an expanded, immersive and more natural sound field

DTS Boost creates richer, fatter sound volume levels without distortion. When listening to speaker playback without headphones, DTS Boost technology delivers a much larger sound by maximizing the phone’s acoustic power and audio playback while maintaining the integrity of the content.

"As smartphones continue to evolve into more feature-rich and sophisticated devices, consumers are seeking the same sound quality that they are accustomed to in their home theater or car. We believe that sound matters across all of these platforms, and with the latest integration of DTS Ultra Mobile into the T-Mobile G2x, customers receive uncompromising sound at their fingertips - ultimately redefining how they use and interact with their mobile devices," said Ian Towne, executive vice president and chief operating officer of DTS.

Tags: DTS

Discussion

Comments currently: 1
Discussion started: 05/16/11 10:34:37 AM
Latest comment: 05/16/11 10:34:37 AM

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This is complete nonsense.
High definition stereo sound means high resolution, i.e. sampling rate and bit depth.
16/44 is already high definition, but most phones are a long way from reproducing at this fidelity let alone driving headphones with acceptable accuracy.

The technology here is not high definition but is a means to lower the fidelity of sound by distorting it in various ways that mass consumers find pleasing ("richer, warmer and more engaging" ).
0 0 [Posted by: CSMR  | Date: 05/16/11 10:34:37 AM]
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