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Valve Software, the owner of Steam video game distributing system, on Thursday announced the release of its Steam for Linux client. The launch of the Steam client for Canonical’s Ubuntu moves Valve a step closer to creation its own Linux-based low-cost personal computers for gaming. What remains to be seen is how well will titles developed with Windows in mind work under different OS.

"The introduction of Steam to Ubuntu demonstrates growing demand for open systems from gamers and game developers. We expect a growing number of game developers to include Ubuntu among their target platforms. We're looking forward to seeing AAA games developed with Ubuntu in mind as part of a multi-platform day and date release on Steam," said David Pitkin, director of consumer applications at Canonical.

The Steam client is now available to download for free from the Ubuntu Software Center. Ubuntu is the most popular distribution of Linux used by millions of people globally and known for its well-designed, easy-to-use customer experience. In celebration of the release, over 50 Linux titles are now 50% - 75% off until Wednesday, February 21st.

In addition to games, the Steam for Linux client includes Big Picture, the new mode of Steam designed for use with a TV and game controller. With Steam for Linux and Big Picture mode, Valve anticipates a growing number of gamers will use Steam in the living room.

Team Fortress 2, a free to play game, is also now available on Steam for Linux. For a limited time, Steam users who play the game on Linux will automatically receive a free, exclusive in-game item: Tux, the Linux mascot, can be carried by any of the game's classes and traded between players. Additional Valve titles available on Steam for Linux include Half-Life, Counter-Strike 1.6, and Counter-Strike: Source.

"We are huge fans of Linux. It's like the indie OS-a perfect home for our indie game. Who better to lead the charge into Linux gaming than Valve? With Steam distribution on Windows, Mac OS, and now Linux, plus the buy-once, play-anywhere promise of Steam Play, our games are available to everyone regardless what type of computer they're running. That's huge," said Alen Ladavac, chief technical officer of Croteam, creator of the Serious Sam franchise of games.  

Tags: Valve Software, Steam, Linux, Ubuntu

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Comments currently: 1
Discussion started: 02/16/13 05:56:54 AM
Latest comment: 02/16/13 05:56:54 AM

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A very nice attitude for the PC-sector. Microsoft is getting old, linux is better. And nobody needs to do separate R&D for everything, that gets lost with companies. Open source is good, but personally when this grows big and mainstream one needs to ditch the code-idolatry of RS also. Please do read: http://paradoxuncreated.com/Blog/wordpress/?p=2268 for how to get games to run amazingly on linux (better than windows) with low-jitter config.

Peace Be With You.
1 0 [Posted by: Paradox Uncreated  | Date: 02/16/13 05:56:54 AM]
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