Intel Launches Device that Can Read Printed Text Aloud

Intel Reader to Bring Texts to People with Disabilities

by Anton Shilov
11/10/2009 | 12:24 PM

Intel Corp. unveiled its new Reader mobile handheld device that can rapidly convert printed text into digital text and can then read it aloud, providing people with certain disabilities an access to various information.

 

"We are proud to offer the Intel Reader as a tool for people who have trouble reading standard print so they can more easily access the information many of us take for granted every day, such as reading a job offer letter or even the menu at a restaurant," said Louis Burns, vice president and general manager of Intel's digital health group.

The Intel Reader, about the size of a paperback book, converts printed text to digital text, and then reads it aloud to the user. Its design combines a high-resolution camera with an Intel Atom processor, allowing users to point, shoot and listen to printed text. The Intel Reader will be available in the United States through select resellers, including CTL, Don Johnston Incorporated, GTSI, Howard Technology Solutions and HumanWare.

When the Intel Reader is used together with the Intel Portable Capture Station, large amounts of text, such as a chapter or an entire book, can be easily captured for reading later. Users will have convenient and flexible access to a variety of printed materials, helping to not only increase their freedom, but improve their productivity and efficiency at school, work and home.

Even though the device has all chances to help people with dyslexia, those, who have low vision or are blind, may not benefit. The device still has text menu and needs to scan texts before reading them aloud.

The Intel Reader has been endorsed by the International Dyslexia Association as an important advance in assistive technology. Additionally, Intel is working with the Association of Assistive Technology Act Programs, the Council for Exceptional Children, Lighthouse International, the National Center for Learning Disabilities and the National Federation of the Blind to help reach and address the needs of people who have difficulty reading print.