Nintendo Found Guilty of Patent Infringement with Stereo-3D Tech on 3DS

Nintendo 3DS Stereo-3D Technology Infringes Patent of Former Sony Employee – U.S. Jury

by Anton Shilov
03/13/2013 | 11:59 PM

Nintendo’s latest 3DS video game console infringes a patent of a former Sony Corp. employee Seijiro Tomita, a federal jury found of Wednesday. The technology that produces stereoscopic 3D effect without special glasses was first patented by Mr. Tomita, who was awarded $30.2 million in compensatory damages.

 

The auto-stereoscopic 3D display used by Nintendo with its 3DS portable video game console relies on pretty simple and well-known method. The S3D display uses a parallax barrier system to display 3D images. This parallax barrier, which has a series of vertical slits, is incorporated into an ordinary LCD to control the path of light reaching the right and left eyes, thus creating a sense of depth. Another name of this technology is called lenticular lenses tech. Since initial parallax barrier-based S3D LCDs had issues with the right reproduction of colors, many companies, including Nintendo, LG, Sharp and others implemented various additional technologies to eliminate the drawback.

In opening arguments last month, Seijiro Tomita's attorney, Joe Diamante, told the jury in U.S. district court in Manhattan that Nintendo used technology that Mr. Tomita, a former longtime Sony Corp employee, developed for its 3DS, reports Reuters news-agency. But Scott Lindvall, a defense attorney for Nintendo, argued that the 3DS doesn't use key aspects of Tomita's patent. The jury decided to award Mr. Tomita with $30.2 million compensatory damages.

Nintendo did not comment the verdict.