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A media report claims that Nokia Corp.’s recently announced Booklet 3G netbook will cost rather whopping $799 at launch, which is too expensive for a netbook in general and a consumer-oriented mobile computer in particular.

Netbooknews.de web-site has reported that Nokia Booklet 3G netbook will cost $799 without subsidies at launch. Considering the general price policy of Nokia, few of its mobile devices get much cheaper over time, but just disappear from the market as a replacement arrives. Considering such a price-point, it is likely to expect Booklet 3G to fail on the market, as the device is too expensive for consumers and is hardly suitable for business users.

Nokia Booklet 3G is based on Intel Atom processor, features 10.1” screen, weighs 1.25 kilograms, measures “slightly more than two centimeters” and supports 3G/HSPA and Wi-Fi connectivity as well as A-GPS support. The netbook also sports Nokia's broad suite of Ovi services. Besides, the mini-laptop comes with an HDMI port for HD video out, a front facing camera for video calling, integrated Bluetooth and an SD card reader.

It is highly likely that the Booklet 3G will be sold via cell network operators with subsidies and with new data contracts. This will drive the pricing down, but will it help to attract a lot of new consumers?

A lot of consumers these days use mobile phones that were acquired at discount prices with contracts, it is unlikely that they will sign up for another contract just to get a netbook from Nokia. At the end, competing systems from other makers cost much less. Of course, Nokia's netbook is made of aluminum and its design may be adored by some customers. But for the majority of potential clients $799 price-point may be too high for a netbook amid economic downturn.

Business users may be willing to sign up for additional data plans, but it is rumoured that Booklet 3G runs Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium, an operating system that lacks certain security and other features that enterprise users may require. Moreover, the system features 10.1” screen, features low-performance Atom processor, lacks DVD playback, but weighs 1.25kg, just like a fully-fledged business-oriented ultra low-voltage notebook.  Overall, those peculiarities do not make Nokia Booklet 3G as a good mobile PC for travelling.

Overall, it remains to be seen, whether Booklet 3G becomes popular. But at this point it does not seem to be a successful return of Nokia to the world of x86-based personal computers. Instead, Booklet 3G looks like a test vehicle to investigate the needs of Nokia’s clients.

Tags: Nokia, Booklet 3G, Intel

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