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Advanced Micro Devices said on Wednesday that after a thorough internal and external search the company has appointed Devinder Kumar as senior vice president and chief financial officer, effective January 2, 2013.

Mr. Kumar (57) will report to Rory Read, AMD president and chief executive officer, and will have responsibility for leading the company’s global finance organization. Kumar has been interim CFO since September 2012. He served as corporate controller of the company since 2001 and as senior vice president since 2006.

“Devinder has been with AMD for more than 28 years and is a talented finance veteran with deep industry knowledge. As we accelerate our strategic growth initiatives, Devinder will play an integral role driving the new business model in the near term and strengthening AMD’s long-term financial foundation,” said Mr. Read.

Kumar joined AMD in 1984 as a financial analyst. He spent 10 years in Asia as financial controller for AMD Penang and group finance director for AMD’s Manufacturing Services Group across Singapore, Thailand, China and Malaysia. Starting in 1998, Kumar assumed several corporate roles including leadership positions in Corporate Accounting and Corporate Finance. He was appointed corporate controller in 2001. He also served as AMD’s assistant treasurer and treasurer between 2007 and 2010 and was most recently senior vice president, corporate controller and interim CFO before being appointed chief financial officer in January, 2013.

Devinder Kumar received a bachelor’s degree from the University of Malaya, Malaysia, a master’s degree from University of California, Santa Barbara and a master’s degree in business administration from University of California, Los Angeles.

Tags: AMD, Business

Discussion

Comments currently: 8
Discussion started: 01/03/13 09:08:48 AM
Latest comment: 01/04/13 11:21:16 AM
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0 6 [Posted by: ten  | Date: 01/03/13 09:08:48 AM]
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The problem is not just management, but lack of $ for proper marketing, engineering talent, R&D and your own fabs. You can hire 10 superstar CFOs and it means nothing when the firm has no $ to build its own fabs, which means it's always 1-1.5 nodes behind Intel. That means it costs Intel less to manufacture chips, lower node means unbeatable performance/watt, and Intel's economies of scale and ability to supply product to large OEMs/customers is unmatched by small companies like AMD.

Secondly, so far even Intel cannot come up with a better smartphone/tablet processor than ARM, Qualcomm, or other competitors in that space. On the server side, AMD would need to design a brand new CPU but they still won't beat Intel there due to performance/watt being critical and they are always behind in node manufacturing. Even if they did start on a design of a new performance-based server CPU, such designs take 3-4 years. There is no money or time for that. On the GPU side, the only truly profitable and growing segment is GPGPU/High performance computing. Sure, you can make $ in laptop/desktop dGPUs but it's not a lot. AMD has no $ to create an eco-system like Nvidia did w/ CUDA. Also, it's unlikely corporate clients would leave the CUDA environment since there are high switching costs and risks.

Since a lot of HPC programs/clients already take advantage of CUDA, the main reasons to switch to AMD would be if their cards worked faster, cost less or used way less power. Unfortunately, NV beat them with Tesla K10/K20/K20X both on absolute performance and performance/watt. A lot of those corporate clients already locked in into that the current upgrade cycle wit those parts. The next time to take away market share in this space won't present itself until 2014.

So even if AMD got new management, what would do they exactly with $2 billion in debt and negative cash flows every quarter, in a declining laptop/PC space? External superstars know this and that's why hardly anyone wants to go to a company that's in so much trouble in all market segments. Instead of acquiring ATI at its peak valuation, for $5.4B and burdening the company with massive debt, AMD should have spent that $ on redesigning a proper successor to A64/X2. I truly believe ATI acquisition was the worst strategic decision their management has ever made.
1 1 [Posted by: BestJinjo  | Date: 01/03/13 12:23:09 PM]
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+1

I agree to a certain extent on most of generally understood financial issues.

I truly believe ATI acquisition was the worst strategic decision their management has ever made.


This is the misunderstood part, there are good reasons for the misunderstanding. The press and people on the outside have no idea about the state of affairs at the time. ATI acquisition saved AMD today more than anything else. All for reasons that cant be published.

One thing many claim and I tend to agree AMD overpaid too much for ATI.

On a side note, acquired from feedback from several of my friends at AMD and acquaintances who were never at AMD but applied for positions at AMD, all say that the interview process, for engineers at least, was one of the toughest they have faced. Intel is much more accommodating in comparison they claim. More so in recent years.

This is expected since AMD has to be choosy in whom they pick. They don't have the luxury given tight budgets to take risks.

I don't deny my certain bias for engineers in general and a rather lack of much praise for management types. Birds of a feather flock together they say. To some extent that maybe true. But those opinions are not mine and its interesting to know this reflects in the quality of people they are hiring.

Just 8 months back another one of my close friends made it into the 3rd round of technical at AMD but couldn't get through, he got into Intel instead. Sure enough he said the same thing about the differences on the overall difficulty levels in interviews.
0 0 [Posted by: vanakkuty  | Date: 01/03/13 07:48:30 PM]
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The press and people on the outside have no idea about the state of affairs at the time. ATI acquisition saved AMD today more than anything else. All for reasons that cant be published.
1) Those who speaks that way really does not understand that there were other and better ways to develop GPU part of AMD business.
2) ATI deal destroyed the cpu part of AMD and as everybody sees now it can't neither return the investments nor rescue AMD because GPU income is much smaller than cpu one.
0 1 [Posted by: Azazel  | Date: 01/03/13 11:52:39 PM]
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What are the other ways to develop the GPU part of the AMD business? What experience you have in this area? Lets hear some of those ideas then we can see if you have anything serious to counter.

AMD's GPU division always has profits even if the net income cant match the CPU division.

And no it did not destroy the CPU division, again sweeping statements without any elaboration on how that is the case. Lets hear them first before I chime in.

PS: Incase you think there is no elaboration in my post why ATI acquisition works, then you don't understand HSA and the bigger picture. Hence why there is nothing to elaborate on as its clearly laid out in public domain over the years to those who were interested to understand this better.
0 0 [Posted by: vanakkuty  | Date: 01/04/13 12:03:23 AM]
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AMD's GPU division always has profits even if the net income cant match the CPU division.
I see you have no idea how GPU div. of AMD did the business.
For about 4 years it brought nothing but red. And only a few last quarters it brought in some small profit, and only God knows will it last in near future if we take into account NV assault.
you don't understand HSA and the bigger picture
As of now, HSA is only marketing label for investors. It has brought ZERO money in the AMD. Taking into account how small AMD will be vs. Intel and NV, very like HSA will not be in short list of programmers.
0 1 [Posted by: Azazel  | Date: 01/04/13 10:27:24 AM]
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I see you have no idea how GPU div. of AMD did the business.
For about 4 years it brought nothing but red. And only a few last quarters it brought in some small profit, and only God knows will it last in near future if we take into account NV assault.


More nonsense.

Show me where AMD's GPU division made a sales loss due build up of inventory.

A profit is still a profit even if its small. No one is talking about it being larger than what a CPU division could bring in.


As of now, HSA is only marketing label for investors. It has brought ZERO money in the AMD. Taking into account how small AMD will be vs. Intel and NV, very like HSA will not be in short list of programmers.


You have no clue about anything other than standard fanboy material that involves sweeping statements without any proof on anything.

The number of members in HSA foundation involves big players like ARM, SAMSING, QUALCOMM etc. And the amount of projects in play you have no idea because you are not the industry.

Go look who the members are see their scope and what they target

http://hsafoundation.com/

If you are sharp eyed you can look up the hiring going on at these firms to know what they are working on, but for that you need some pedigree in engineering and or some basic understanding of how industry works.

You clearly don't have that.

I am a product development engineer for a chipmaker you know very well. Which means working closely with design and foundry teams and own+develop the entire test program for complete logic, functional, shorts/open test etc. I won't name it nor give out my name if I have to continue conversing on the internet. So its a bit funny you tell me how I don't know about this industry. An arm chair critique surely knows much more from the outside, interesting.

HSA is going to enable a platform where AMD leads not by closing but opening it up for development around which they can position their hardware to best take advantage of both the CPU and GPU, with tools making programming easier and totally abstracted to the programmer. This results in architecture development that is easy to mix match between AMD IPs and IPs from partner companies who have started to adopt HSA tools. It benefits all of them to enter markets with ease, less time to market due to less design changes to IP to cater to a wide range of markets.

They don't care about Intel and they don't need Intel. When this takes off Intel is either forced to support it or come up with their own which will be nothing more than a copy of HSA's efforts resulting in HSA still being the preferred standard by then.

Did a little dig into your past activities in here and its filled with more of the same trolling material, sweeping statements etc

I see you have also avoided my question on how you claimed

Azael wrote "those who speaks that way really does not understand that there were other and better ways to develop GPU part of AMD business."


Again what is your qualification or any experience in this industry? And what ideas would those be? Lets hear them first.

Based on that I can know if you are in it for merely trolling or actually engaging in tech talk.
0 0 [Posted by: vanakkuty  | Date: 01/04/13 11:21:16 AM]
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@ten: AMDers disagree with you on this, they are more than happy to have Devinder instead of Thomas who he replaced. They say good riddance to Thomas.
1 0 [Posted by: vanakkuty  | Date: 01/03/13 07:44:04 PM]
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