Microsoft’s Chief Executive: Nobody Wants to Pay $500 for Apple’s Logo These Days

Steve Ballmer Slams Apple, Predicts Macintosh Sales to Drop Because of Pricing

by Anton Shilov
03/23/2009 | 01:28 PM

Steve Ballmer, the head of Microsoft Corp., has made a rather radical prediction: sales of Apple computers were about to drop since the biggest thing Macintosh systems provide is the Apple logotype on them.

 

There is no secret that Mac computers cost considerably more compared to Microsoft Windows-based machines with similar hardware inside. Many believe that Macs provide fair amount of benefits for their price, but it is logical to assume that amid the global economic slump even more would consider whether those benefits actually exist and whether they are valuable.

“Apple gained about one point, but now I think the tide has really turned back the other direction. The economy is helpful. Paying an extra $500 for a computer in this environment – same piece of hardware – paying $500 more to get a logo on it? I think that's a more challenging proposition for the average person than it used to be,” said Steve Ballmer at the McGraw-Hill Companies’ 2009 Media Summit, reports TechFlash web-site.

Many argue that Apple Macintosh systems are more stylish compared to Windows-based systems, however, with the emergence of systems like Dell Adamo, Voodoo Envy 133 and so on, style ceased to be a prerogative of Apple. Just like Macs, modern desktops and laptops are based on microprocessors by Intel Corp. and, unlike into Macs, it is possible to install high-performance graphics cards (to enjoy modern video games) or Blu-ray disc drives (to watch high-definition movies) into Windows-based machines.

There are some natural advantages that Apple Macintosh systems may have over Windows-based personal computers: hardware is and software platforms should be better tailored together thanks to the fact that they come from the same manufacturer. Nevertheless, there are many system makers who provide premium class support to their clients who acquire personal computers with Windows operating system onboard.