Lenovo Executive Sees Potential in PCs, Admits Slow Windows 8 Adoption

Chief Financial Officer of Lenovo Still Interested in PC Business

by Anton Shilov
07/17/2013 | 11:00 PM

Sales of personal computers have been declining in the recent quarters as a result of growing adoption of smartphones and tablets as well as due to slow economy. Nonetheless, the market of PCs is still worth over $200 billion a year, which means that no significant PC maker will actually leave the market and refocus on tablets, smartphones and other new-age mobile devices. Lenovo Group, the world’s largest PC maker, remains confident in PCs.

 

“Demand for notebook and desktop PCs has been affected by two factors. One is technology, like tablets and other mobile devices, and the other is the economic environment. The economy is definitely a factor behind the market’s on-year decline that we are seeing. The market for notebook and desktop PCs is still worth $200 billion. I think that’s huge. From a business point of view there are still many opportunities for us to explore. We remain confident,” said Wong Wai Ming, chief financial officer of Lenovo, in an interview with the Wall Street Journal.

The highly-ranking executive of Lenovo admits: Microsoft Corp.’s Windows 8 operating system could not bolster sales of personal computers due to various reasons. Moreover, since its launch the sales of PCs actually declined further. However, the CFO believes that over time Windows 8 will become more familiar to end-users and will thus be more popular.

“When you change from the original Windows operating system to a more touch-based system, I think it will take a little longer for the market to adapt and learn about the new system. At the same time, I am sure that Microsoft will continue to improve the system. With combined effort by vendors and Microsoft to promote the system, I am sure that the market will begin to realize the value of Windows 8, and that will have a positive impact on demand,” said Wong Wai Ming.

In case Windows 8.1 “Blue” will be better received by the end-user than Windows 8 and the economy somewhat improves, PC sales will actually increase, Lenovo’s financial boss believes.