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Intel Corp. has announced plans to discontinue its X25-M and X18-M solid-state drives (SSDs) that are based on multi-level cell flash produced using 50nm process technology. The process is rather natural given that the company already ships SSDs powered by 34nm flash chips that are not only more affordable, but also offer higher performance.

Due to migration of Intel X25/X18-M (MLC) SSD technology from 50nm to 34nm, Intel 50nm X25/X18-M SATA SSDs with 80GB and 160GB capacities are being discontinued, the chip giant said.

Orders for 50nm Intel X25/X18-M SATA in 80GB and 160GB capacities will no longer be accepted or cancellable after the 20th of April, 2010. Last shipment date for the first-generation X25-M and X18-M SSDs is August 7th, 2010.

Intel released its first-generation X25-M and X18-M solid-state drives for consumers in August 2008 and started to ship its second-generation X25-M/X18-M in late July 2009. It can be observed that product life for an SSD model on the market is a little more than one year, much shorter than that of mainstream and high-end central processing units.

Tags: Intel, SSD, 50nm

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