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Super Talent, a leading supplier of premium PC components, on Thursday revealed a new line of solid-state drives (SSDs) that is powered by controllers from SandForce company and which offer enhanced reliability and improved performance. The drives are aimed at enterprise and database applications, still, they only offer Serial ATA, not Serial Attached SCSI for truly enterprise positioning.

Super Talent’s TeraDrive FT2-series solid-state drives feature either multi-level cell (MLC) or single-level cell (SLC) flash as well as advanced SandForce controller. The new TeraDrive FT2 is a Serial ATA-300 SSD featuring the advanced new SandForce SF-1500 SSD processor. It delivers sequential read and write speeds up to 250MB/s that will not degrade over time. It also supports fast transaction speeds up to 30 000 IOPS, making it a superior storage solution for database servers where random read and write speeds are critical.

“We engineered the TeraDrive FT2 for optimum performance and reliability in server applications, especially where fast random access to small files is needed,” said Joe James, director of marketing at Super Talent.

The TeraDrive FT2 features a number of SandForce technologies, including RAISE (Redundant Array of Independent Silicon Elements) for enhanced reliability and DuraWrite technology for significantly increased endurance, state-of-the-art wear leveling, bad block management, and excellent ECC with up to 24 symbols correctable per 512 byte sector.

“Super Talent has a solid track record of developing leading edge SSDs. Their new TeraDrive series, incorporating SandForce technology, is an impressive advance in enterprise storage,” commented Thad Omura, vice president of marketing at SandForce.

Tags: Super Talent, SSD, SandForce

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Discussion started: 01/22/10 05:41:26 PM
Latest comment: 01/22/10 05:41:26 PM

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I'll be interested in seeing the real-world performance of these drives. Sandforce has some pretty good ideas, but things like hardware-based compression schemes have never been popular before with good reason.
0 0 [Posted by: siuol11  | Date: 01/22/10 05:41:26 PM]
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