News
 

Bookmark and Share

(2) 

Hewlett-Packard and Hynix Semiconductor plan to finally reveal their memristor-based resistive random access memory (ReRAM) products in about eighteen months from now, sometimes in summer, 2013. The companies plan to offer “alternative” solid-state drives as well as USB memory sticks, but it is hard to determine any actual details or peculiarities.

"We have a lot of big plans for it and we're working with Hynix Semiconductor to launch a replacement for flash in the summer of 2013 and also to address the solid-state drive market. [There is no definitive memristor product roadmap as yet], but HP has a goal to see memristor products by the end of 2013,” said Stan Williams, senior fellow at HP Labs, at a conference, reports EETimes web-site.

The memristor, short for “memory resistor,” requires less energy to operate, can retain information even when power is off, and is faster than present solid-state storage technologies. It was postulated to be the fourth basic circuit element by professor Leon Chua of UC Berkeley in 1971 and first intentionally reduced to practice by researchers in HP Labs, the company’s central research arm, in 2006. The technology can also perform logic, enabling computation to one day be performed in chips where data is stored, rather than on a specialized central processing unit.

The ReRAM is a product that holds potential to replace the flash memory currently used in smartphones, tablets, MP3 players and to serve as a universal storage medium - that is, memory that can behave as flash, DRAM or even a hard drive.

The HP fellow declined to discuss in detail the process technology, memory capacity or memory-effect material that Hewlett Packard and Hynix are working with. But Mr. Williams did disclose that the first commercial memory would be a multi-layer device.

"We're running hundreds of wafers through a Hynix full-size fab. We're very happy with it,” the official for HP said.

Tags: HP, Hewlett-Packard, Hynix, ReRAM, Memristor, Flash

Discussion

Comments currently: 2
Discussion started: 10/09/11 05:07:48 PM
Latest comment: 10/10/11 11:32:56 AM

[1-2]

1. 
The memristors are coming! The memristors are coming!
0 0 [Posted by: AuDioFreaK39  | Date: 10/09/11 05:07:48 PM]
Reply

2. 
The ability of many these non-volatile memory technologies to become true universal memory is limited by the number of write cycles that they can sustain. Even a write endurance that is several thousands or millions times greater than that of flash makes that type of memory unsuitable as a DRAM or SRAM replacement. By all accounts, this appears to apply to ReRAM as well.

The eventual replacement of flash, in almost all respects a flawed technology, by new types of NVRAM is inevitable, however. The major obstacle to this is the fact that flash manufacturers are so heavily invested in this technology that they are unwilling to make that transition despite their overwhelming technological advantages.
0 0 [Posted by: lol123  | Date: 10/10/11 11:32:56 AM]
Reply

[1-2]

Add your Comment




Related news

Latest News

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

10:40 pm | ARM Preps Second-Generation “Artemis” and “Maya” 64-Bit ARMv8-A Offerings. ARM Readies 64-Bit Cores for Non-Traditional Applications

7:38 pm | AMD Vows to Introduce 20nm Products Next Year. AMD’s 20nm APUs, GPUs and Embedded Chips to Arrive in 2015

4:08 am | Microsoft to Unify All Windows Operating Systems for Client PCs. One Windows OS will Power PCs, Tablets and Smartphones

Monday, July 21, 2014

10:32 pm | PQI Debuts Flash Drive with Lightning and USB Connectors. PQI Offers Easy Way to Boost iPhone or iPad Storage

10:08 pm | Japan Display Begins to Mass Produce IPS-NEO Displays. JDI Begins to Mass Produce Rival for AMOLED Panels

12:56 pm | Microsoft to Fire 18,000 Employees to Boost Efficiency. Microsoft to Perform Massive Job Cut Ever Following Acquisition of Nokia