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Enermax Everest, Cluster, Magma

Now let’s talk about a more technologically serious family of Enermax fans. Here we have three models with the blades of the same shape, but each with its own distinguishing features. These fans are called Everest, Cluster and Magma and are shipped in clear plastic boxes with an information insert inside:

 

The fans come together with a PATA power connector, four silicone mounting spindles, four self-tapping screws and a manual with installation and cleaning tips. Everest and Cluster models feature LED lighting, but only Everest is bundled with three stickers with yellow, red and blue stripes:

 

Everest and Cluster fans feature a miniature On/Off lighting switch and Everest also has a thermal diode:

 

Besides different technical specifications, the fans have different frames and blades of different color. Everest and Cluster modding fans are of clear and white color, while the most powerful Magma model comes with a black frame and bright-red fan blades:

  

The fans measure 120x120x25 mm, their weight is not specified. Each fan has 9 blades and a rotor with 40 mm diameter. The fans’ power cables are 500 mm long:

The key peculiarity of the fans from this Enermax series are the so-called BATWING-blades. Each BATWING-blade consists of two distinct parts, each looking like an individual small blade with a sail-like curve:

Besides, these two parts of the blade are turned relative to one another. According to the manufacturer, these two-sectional blades generate 30% higher airflow at the same speed as common single-section ones. It is a very impressive promise and we really hope it will prove true.

The fans from this series have different technical specifications. The Everest model works at variable speed changing automatically depending on the temperature coming from the thermal diode from 500 to 1000 RPM. Cluster fan equipped with a PWM controller works at 500-1200 RPM, and the most powerful Magma fan works at 1500 RPM. The airflow and static pressure values are provided in the spec table. The maximum noise from these fans is promised not to exceed 18 dBA.

Enermax uses the same Twister bearing for these fans as in Apollo. The fan blade unit can be removed easily:

 

From the power standpoint, these Enermax fans are far from being called economical: they require a current between 0.25 and 0.40 A and consume between 3 and 4.8 W of power.

  

LED lighting kicks in at 3.3 V on Everest fans and at 3.0 V on Cluster fans.

Enermax Everest, Cluster and Magma fans are priced at $19 each.

Now let’s check out the results:

As you see, Everest equipped with a thermal diode acts strangely, just like Apollo, but it works quieter. The two other models performed better, though they are still far from the leaders in airflow as well as acoustics. Cluster and Magma fans reach their acoustic comfort zone at 960 and 1020 RPM respectively, but the noise generated by the former is a little higher. It must result from the fact that these fans use different frames: the Cluster frame is perforated that creates additional noise. The actual power consumption of these fans turned out lower than the declared one. The startup voltages were 5.7 V for Everest, 3.0 for Cluster and 4.8 for Magma.

 
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